Review: Dial M for Murder, at the King's Theatre

Dial M for Murder, playing at Edinburgh’s King’s Theatre as part of a UK tour, is an enjoyable adaption of Frederick Knott’s classic thriller. Affairs, revenge, plotting and deception – this play has it all, but struggles to stand out.

⭐⭐⭐

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Review: Rambert, at the Festival Theatre

Two splendid revivals, and a revelation, courtesy of Britain’s oldest dance company. Rambert, playing at Edinburgh’s Festival theatre, is a feast for the senses.

⭐⭐⭐⭐

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Review: I Think We Are Alone, at the King’s Theatre

Not unlike a chess match with a player well beyond your own talents, I Think You Are Alone, by Sally Abbott, opens with a series of fascinating, but apparently unconnected moves. However, just when you think this fine production from Frantic Assembly, might have over-sold itself, the parts are combined to tremendous effect. The play ties itself together with human connections, the need to truly listen to one another, and in doing so demonstrates their life-enriching power.

⭐⭐⭐⭐

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Review: Trojan Horse, at the Traverse Theatre

Trojan Horse, from LUNG Theatre, is a fine piece of verbatim theatre, and an urgent call for a more rational approach to our public, and political, discourse on Islamophobia. Writer (with Helen Monks) and Director Matt Woodhead displays real talent in sculpting the ‘show’ from the solid block of ‘tell.’

⭐⭐⭐⭐

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Review: Dead Good, at The Studio

Dead Good, from VAMOS Theatre, is a silent, expressive journey into friendship, and death. It’s a truly accessible show, with a valuable, and heart-felt message. If it starts a little slow, it sure finishes with a bang.

⭐⭐⭐

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Review: Peter Pan Goes Wrong, at the Festival Theatre

Peter Pan Goes Wrong is a funny, silly, unashamedly tongue-in-cheek production, in which everything that could possibly ‘go wrong’, does. The play is very much what it says on the tin – and, whilst there is an element of predictability in that, Mischief Theatre easily pull it off.

⭐⭐⭐⭐

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Review: Mouthpiece, at the Traverse Theatre

Mouthpiece, by Kieran Hurley, takes a meta-analytical scalpel to the concept of theatre as social commentary. A tremendous script, and strong performances, ultimately render this show equal to its daring, and complex, narrative ambitions.

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

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